What I Miss About Traditional Publishing

For all the Big Five’s devotion to formulae, data collection and analysis models, they still fail to predict true viral successes such as “Fifty Shades”, and clearance racks everywhere are filled with their predicted “sure-fire” successes.
The likes of Hocking, Howey and James have so far cashed in their self-made chips, but one of these years, an author who has become successful on their own terms will see no point in signing up with the Big Five.

Deborah Cooke & Her Books

Although I am now an indie author, I was traditionally published—i.e. published by big publishing houses based in New York City—for twenty years. It was almost exactly the twentieth anniversary of my first sale when I stepped away from traditional publishing. I sold my first book to a publisher in April 1992, and declined the offer from my last publisher in March 2012.

In the last five years, I’ve repackaged and republished a lot of backlist titles (because the rights have reverted to me from the original publishers) and also have published a good bit of new work myself. The last three books in the Dragonfire series were indie-published, as was the True Love Brides series of medieval romances, as was Tupperman’s story, Abyss. Indie publishing gave me the opportunity to finish series that wouldn’t have been possible in traditional publishing. Five years ago, I thought that would be…

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