When opposites attract, are they opposites?


I’ve been reading the five novels (so far) in Emily Guido’s Light-Bearer Series.

The central theme is “opposites attract.” The Light-Bearer (angel) Charmeine and her eternal soul mate, Blood-Hunter (vampire) Tabbruis, battle those prejudiced against their “forbidden” mixed relationship (much like my character Jack must overcome his community’s prejudice against special-needs vampires).

As you delve deeper and deeper into the saga, the question becomes: Are the attracting “opposites” in fact opposites, or merely two sides of the same coin?

1992-S JFK Half Dollar

My main character Jack Wendell’s lucky 1992 JFK Half Dollar


In Ransom, Emily titled Chapter 15 “No Shades Of Grey” :twisted:, but by the time we’re that deep into the fifth book of the Series, a whole palette of morality’s grey shades unfolds before your eyes. Just like in Vampire Syndrome: Are the villains really villains from their points of view? Or even the hero’s? A good story makes the hero question who are the heroes and villains. A great story leaves readers with questions of their own. Emily’s Series accomplishes just that, and I would say my work does the same. In Ransom, what is the titular “ransom?” Not what you would you think (even after the end of book 4, Seditious)!

What seems to be a clear “black & white”, “good vs. evil” world in book 1, Charmeine, evolves into a world painted in expressionist flourishes of greyed moral choices.

Leaving us to question if there are even “heroes” and “villains.” We are all but actors on this stage play that we call “life.” The two sides of the coin, telling the tales, singing the songs, same at our core despite our differences. All of our parts important, whether we play hero or villain. All of our free will acting alongside the supreme intelligence force driving the universe, which some would simply call God.

John Franklin Stephens

I wrote a novel with a Down Syndrome protagonist, and I’m proud to say my character Jack Wendell is a dignified, wise being.. just like John Franklin Stephens!

John Franklin Stephens: “Using The “R” Word” essay (Denver Post)

The World of Special Olympics

The following is a guest post in the form of an open letter from Special Olympics athlete and global messenger John Franklin Stephens to Ann Coulter after this tweet during last night’s Presidential debate.

Dear Ann Coulter,

Come on Ms. Coulter, you aren’t dumb and you aren’t shallow.  So why are you continually using a word like the R-word as an insult?

I’m a 30 year old man with Down syndrome who has struggled with the public’s perception that an intellectual disability means that I am dumb and shallow.  I am not either of those things, but I do process information more slowly than the rest of you.  In fact it has taken me all day to figure out how to respond to your use of the R-word last night.

I thought first of asking whether you meant to describe the President as someone who was bullied as a child…

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