Five-Star Review from TV/Film Producer Joel Eisenberg

“Vampire Syndrome” just received a five-star review from Hollywood TV/Film producer Joel Eisenberg. 😀


After Reading “Jack Wendell’s Vampire Syndrome,” I Felt As Though I Had Never Read a Vampire Novel Before.
By Joel Eisenberg, Author of The Chronicles of Ara on October 17, 2015

Really, how many variations of the vampire theme can there possibly be? Surely, this genre is well-worn; what can possibly be done to rejuvenate it?

Welcome, “Jack Wendell’s Vampire Syndrome.” I promise, you have never read a vampire book like this one.

Let’s begin this way: Jack Wendell, a Special Olympics champion with Down Syndrome, is turned into a vampire (hence the Vampire Syndrome in the title). That enough? Then how’s this: Jack strives for acceptance within his new community and is immediately ordered to be killed. Read Daven’s synopsis on this site. It’s all there. He’s not joking about “space alien Pure vampires” either.

Somehow, Daven Anderson makes it all work. The story is metaphoric for sure, but man is this work compelling. There’s a good deal of tongue in cheek here but not once did I feel the author or his story pandered. This is a compelling work.

Jack Wendell is a character unique to modern fiction. Characters with Down Syndrome have been used frequently in media, see the television shows “Life Goes On” or “American Horror Story.” Autistic protagonists too have been used widely in literature over the past 25 years, but in lit circles fully drawn characters with Down Syndrome have been rare.

Here though is something different and I hope I express this as I mean to: Jack is ‘cool.’ Do I feel sorry for him as he runs from his death sentence? Of course. Am I curious about his budding friendship with Lilith, who will attempt to save him? Yes. But more than this, I lose track of any disabilities on the part of the main character, and root for him as I would for anyone. And then it comes back to me that I’m reading a tale about a boy – a vampire – with Down Syndrome and I’m compelled to credit the author all the more.

This is a special novel and certain to be a special series. Daven is clearly a unique author. He is also a special educator and knows this world well. Jack is a real person to me, in an extraordinary circumstance.

The conflicts inherent therein make for the best of fiction. This is one of my very favorite novels that I’ve read all year.

Kudos Mr. Anderson. A remarkable, fun work.

Joel Amazon Review - Screengrab

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The Special Proposal – Love Knows No Bounds

An ‘A Capella’ quintet, singing inside a McDonald’s in Italy. Out of the ordinary, but so is love. This proposal is the perfect reminder of why we all matter. Because we all deserve the chance to savor the worlds that life has to offer.

Happy World Down Syndrome Day!

Jack Wendell, protagonist of the Vampire Syndrome Saga, would like to wish everyone in the world a Happy World Down Syndrome Day! #worlddownsyndromeday

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2nd and Charles Signing Flyer Apr 2015 Negative

Mactus e-book, free on Amazon Oct. 6 and 7

If you’re searching for YA paranormal romance, and you decided to check out my blog because it’s called “Vampire Syndrome”, I have some good news for you.

Emily Guido’s novel Mactus, book two of The Light-Bearer Series, will be free on Amazon this weekend (Sat. Oct 6, Sun. Oct 7).
Her latest blog post features the action-packed chapter “Soaring“.

I must admit that her YA paranormal romance is quite different from my novel “Vampire Syndrome”, which is an adult-reader urban paranormal, and not a romance. But her Light-Bearer Series and my Vampire Syndrome saga have a common theme.

Fighting prejudice.

In Emily’s series, Tabbruis (A sanguinarian Blood-Hunter) meets his soul-mate Charmeine (a lightning-throwing Light-Bearer). Their kindred are prejudiced against one another, so Tabbruis and Charmeine will have to fight to survive (and raise their family!)

In Vampire Syndrome, newly-turned Jack Wendell, born with Down Syndrome, quickly discovers the vampire community’s long-standing prejudice against special-needs vampires like himself. Jack has to convince other vampires that he is an asset to their community. Even winning over powerful allies will not end Jack’s problems, because Jack discovers the human vampires have a fearsome enemy, the Pure (alien) vampires. And the Pures want Jack to be their servant. 😈

Two different sagas, two different sub-genres of paranormal, but under all that, one underlying theme. We have to learn to overcome our differences and find common ground, to survive, and to thrive. 🙂

This is why I’m proud to feature Emily’s novel on my blog.

The Mysteries Of Aging

USA Today: Down Syndrome patients could unlock mysteries of aging

A key point in my novel is that those who are “disabled” may be “gifted” in other ways. The phrase “differently abled” can express this fundamental principle.

Down Syndrome individuals face numerous health challenges, but (as the above linked article shows) they also have some important health advantages.
“people with Down syndrome virtually never develop high blood pressure, heart attacks or hardening of the arteries”
They may even hold the key to the cure for cancer.
“Researchers already are trying to develop anti-cancer treatments based on genes found on (Down Syndrome) chromosome 21, says Roger Reeves of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine”

My novel’s protagonist Jack Wendell struggles with the vampire community’s long-standing prejudices against special-needs individuals. His situation becomes very interesting when it’s revealed that another group of vampires, the Pures, view him as being “gifted” instead of “disabled”.